i tonya I

Movies of the Moment: I Tonya

I Tonya

Rounding out films that are still out in theatres, I’d be extremely remiss not to comment on I, Tonya. For those of you living under a boulder (I kid), I, Tonya recounts the story of Tonya Harding, at one time one of the best figure skaters in the world ( to note: the first American woman to land the notoriously difficult triple axel jump), who weathered unimaginable scandal on account of the 1994 attack on her teammate Nancy Kerrigan. I remember this story so vividly from my childhood- growing up in the midwest, the Winter Olympics were a huge event for us and my family and I watched the figure skating championships near religiously. When this story line unfolded we, like the rest of America, were enraptured in it. And yet, there were so many details of the story that I was too young to absorb, or too naive to realize that I had internalized as fact. In this respect, I, Tonya serves as a redemption tale for someone who became, during my childhood, a caricature of the evil villain writ large.

And yet, I, Tonya isn’t a tale of redemption at all. It is, at its core, a really excruciating account of a life of poverty of violence- first of the parental variety, then the marital variety- and finally of the societal variety. And I found the consistent and raw abuse almost too much to handle. There was no tempering of her suffering when she grew up, moved out of her home, or left her husband. Rather, she is consistently and brutally punished every step of the way despite her boundless work ethic and pursuit of something better. Given that, I found it really hard to reconcile this movie as a comedy (despite it’s comedic elements- brought to the fore by an incredible cast of characters as they adopt their respective characters with undeniable gusto). Pictured below, Allison Janney in the role she was born to play, as Tony Hardings abusive mother.

 

Despite finding the violence near unbearable, the movie is extremely well done – and my husband and friends absolutely loved it. It has taken distance from some of the more difficult scenes for me to embrace just how genius this movie is but all the same, I’ve come around. And like Lady Bird below, it is another example of a film that plays exquisitely to the 90’s/2000s nostalgia that is swallowing pop culture whole at the moment (perhaps a testament to the fact that we would all rather escape to the scandals of our childhoods then live the scandals of the moment, which feel too heavy to bear). Margot Robbie as Tonya, Allison Janney as LaVona Harding, Sebastian Stan as Jeff Gillooly, and Paul Walter Hauser as Shawn are all absolutely exceptional in their respective roles.

It’s worth noting that watching this movie prompted me to also watch the  2 hour ABC special: Truth and Lies, the Tonya Harding Story last week and it was insane to learn how accurate the events of the movie are. I recommend watching the special as well if you can’t get enough of early 90’s figure skaters, because honestly, who can? Not I.

I Tonya- Violent, insane, well-executed, funny, and tragic. A little like the woman herself.

 

 

i tonya I

Movies of the Moment- Lady Bird

In the next installment of our film series is the exquisite coming of age story, Lady Bird. Written and directed by the brilliant Greta Gerwig, (who also wrote Frances Ha- one of my favorite independent movies of recent years) Lady Bird tells the story of a young woman in Sacramento dealing with trials of family, relationships and friendships during her final year of high school. The film takes place in 2002/2003, and the walk down early 2000s memory lane is but one of many wonderfully enjoyable things about this film.

Lady Bird, is, at its core, a movie about relationships. In the male-female relationship category, we are treated to a range of beautifully accurate snapshots of Lady Bird with the men in her life, whether the tender relationship between father and daughter, the fraught relationship of sister and brother, or the tortured relationships she has with her two boyfriends in the film (played exquisitely by Lucas Hedges and Timothy Chalamet). Pictured below, “nice” boyfriend Danny O’Neill with Lady Bird in one of my favorite scenes from the film.

But where the movie really shines is in the accuracy of the female relationships that it portrays- whether between Lady Bird and her best friend (the utterly delightful Beanie Feldstein, pictured below), or with her difficult mother, played to an absolute T by Laurie Metcalf. You can always tell the difference between a female and a male writer via the complexity and beauty of the female relationships, and this is where Gerwig really shines. Lady Bird is alternately cruel and imminently supportive of her best friend, and theirs is the love upon which the movie is built. It’s a great testament to female friendships, which don’t always get their due in film.

Her relationship with her mother, on the other hand, brought back memories of every squabble I ever had with my own mother as a teenager, as filtered through an even starker lens. As I stare down the impending birth of my own daughter, I’ve given a lot of thought to how I can nurture that relationship and correct for those inevitable differences of opinion. The excruciating part about watching Lady Bird and her mother’s relationship play out, from the vantage point of being both no longer a teenager and not yet a middle aged adult, is that one is left feeling tortured for both of them. And that is why Gerwig again is so brilliant- her characters are multi dimensional- at once cruel and selfish and at other turns nurturing and sympathetic.

All in, I couldn’t recommend Lady Bird highly enough. And in case you are wondering, my husband loved it just as much. It is a wonderfully written and directed film that does a remarkable job of conveying the teenage experience in a way that is delicate and humorous. I hope that she wins all of the awards for this one- and it goes without saying that I can’t wait to see what Gerwig does next.

i tonya I

Movies of the Moment – The Post

We’ve been trying to watch as many movies as possible lately, mainly because other parents feel it necessary to frequently and relentlessly fearmonger us with comments like “You’ll never be able to watch a movie again.” Any excuse to plant ourselves in front of a screen in the name of living our best lives is A-OK with us, and I have to say we’ve caught some stellar films so far on account of it. Virtually every movie out right now is best in class due to it being award season, but I wanted to recount a few this week that we’ve particularly enjoyed, kicking off with Steven Spielberg’s The Post.

 

The Post

Directed by Steven Spielberg, and starring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks. I could probably end the review right there and that would be enough to impel you to see the film. But this is an important movie to watch in this moment of history, so a little more detail is due.

First, a brief history lesson. The story of the Post is the story of the Pentagon Papers, officially titled “United States- Vietnam Relations, 1945-1967: A Study Prepared by the Department of Defense.” The papers, in essence, detailed scathing truths about the U.S.’ involvement in Vietnam. One, that the Johnson Administration “systematically lied, not only to the public but also to Congress.” And two, that the U.S. had secretly enlarged the scope of its actions in the Vietnam War with the bombings of Cambodia and Laos, coastal raids on North Vietnam, and Marine Corps attacks, none of which were reported in the mainstream media. The papers were released by Daniel Ellsberg, who had worked on the study, and were first brought to light by the New York Times , for which the NYT was served an injunction by the U.S. attorney general. For his disclosure of the Pentagon Papers, Ellsberg was initially charged with conspiracy, espionage, and theft of government property, but the charges were later dismissed after prosecutors investigating the Watergate Scandal discovered that the staff members in the Nixon White House had ordered the so-called White House Plumbers to engage in unlawful efforts to discredit Ellsberg. The Post is about the moment that the Washington Post enters  the fray on the heels of the NYT, to publish the remaining papers, exposing a massive cover up of government secrets regarding the US’ involvement in Vietnam that spans 3 decades and 4 U.S. Presidents.

These themes- of thankless wars entered into on lies, of presidential administrations lying to and denigrating the mainstream media, of leakers willing to face imprisonment to share the truth with the public, then outed as traitors; and the importance of a free press- are top of mind for anyone who has lived through the Iraq War as well as the first year of the Trump administration. And it is toward the latter, in so many ways, that this film is a direct and unapologetic response. While the film regrettably trades in some of the more poignant historical lessons regarding U.S. involvement in Vietnam for high drama, it’s focus on the necessity of a free and respected press for the perpetuation of democracy is a huge one. For the magnitude of that lesson alone, I suspect it will win plenty of awards.

But there are also a number of moments and details that more subtly appeal to the senses. For one, Katherine Graham (played by the glorious Meryl Streep) plays the first female publisher of a major American Newspaper. Anyone who has ever been the only woman in a room full of men can identify with the shot of her entering a room full of bankers at a meeting during which they will set the IPO price for the Washington Post. In it, Streep is surrounded by a swarm of men in dark suits, and while they tangentially acknowledge her presence (despite her ostensibly being the most important person in the room), the scene only reinforces how invisible and insignificant they deem her to be. I wanted so badly for her to bust their chops as only a woman can, but I was reminded only of the times and how many women like her had to fight to get one word in edgewise, so that I could get in 100. It was a powerful reminder of how far we’ve come.

The story of the Post, then, is also one about a woman finding her voice, and blazing a heretofore uncharted trail. It is Graham who has the final word on whether to publish, and despite the risk to her career, company, and family’s inheritance, she makes the honorable choice.

On a visual level, it is also rich with gorgeous details showcasing the Georgetown homes of the 1970s Washington elite, and the incredible wardrobes of their inhabitants. My absolute favorite scene on this front is the one below, wherein Graham dons a glorious caftan while hosting a party in the garden of her Georgetown home. Just LOOK at that caftan and that hair. She is everything I have ever wanted to be. The intricate wood panelling in her study and the abundance of classic furniture only add to the sumptuousness of the sets.

 

Overall the Post does a tremendous job balancing beautiful period details and high drama with critical themes for the moment. More than anything, it serves a sobering warning that despite our perceived societal progress (and the passing of some 50 years), we currently face staggeringly similar threats to the freedom of our press and society at large. It is a warning that we should be keen to heed and address head on, if we are indeed to survive.

 

i tonya I

Scents & Sensibility

She sidled up next to me, trying on a harmless but inquisitive tone. “Did you just meet with the president of the company?” she asked.

I was taken aback; I had, in fact, just met with him, in my typical style- to share my observations about what was going wrong, as I saw it. Also in my typical style, I hadn’t shared this information with anyone.

“I did…,” I hesitated, then smiled. “How did you know?”

“Your PERFUME!” she beamed, having solved the case. “I walked into my meeting with him and immediately asked if he’d met with you. I could still smell your amazing perfume in his office!”

Stealth, I was not. Perhaps signature scents don’t mix well with going incognito. But my pride at her flattery superseded any concern about my meeting’s intention being known.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

I come by my obsession with fragrance honestly – it’s in my blood. The National reports: “Throughout history, Arabs have used fragrance as a form of art, a symbol of reverence, and a token of beauty. In the 13th century the Sufi Arab mystic, Ibn Arabi, wrote in his masterpiece, Pearls of Wisdom, ‘of all the worldly goods, three things are dearest to my heart: perfume, women and prayer.”

The Arab world was instrumental to the evolution of the fragrance industry as we know it. It was Arab perfumers who developed the traditions and techniques that laid the foundation for the industry today. And one must only look so far as wardrobe to understand why this is; in a region where modest dressing is de riguer (and many in the gulf region wear abayas or dishdashes), the face and the scent become the focus. In fact, Emiratis- along with their Persian Gulf neighbors in Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, and Oman, are the biggest spenders per capita on luxury perfume in the world- buying as much as 3 times as much perfume as their Western counterparts. As for my own country of origin, Syria, it was the birthplace of the Damask rose (the name refers to Damascus, Syria, where the flower is said to have originated).

All of which is to say that my affinity for fragrance runs deep, and my collection is a reflection of the places I’ve been and the memories I’ve made in them, At one point, another former colleague and I almost started a boutique perfumerie business here in NYC. While we never pursued that particular passion (aedes de Venustas and MiN New York have a great collection if you share our affinity), I wanted to share a smaller selection of my favorites with you today. Herewith, my Top Five.

Acqua di parma: Blu Mediterraneo – Mirto di Panarea

My husband says of all the perfumes I wear, this is his favorite, as it reminds him of our early days. Because of this, I made the decision to wear it on our wedding day, a sweet throwback to those times.

I first bought this scent years ago at the Neiman Marcus on Michigan Avenue in Chicago, and have since repurchased it a number of times.This perfume is a sea breeze, combining aromatic notes of myrtle and basil with lemon and bergamot, a hint of jasmine and rose, and a base of juniper, cedar wood and amber. It is fresh and evocative; a perfect summer scent, although I often wear it year round. This whole line is delicious- traditional, crisp, and beautiful.

 

Sospiro Collection: Allegro

The only word for this perfume is intoxicating. I discovered and purchased it in Dubai as it was originally released exclusively for the Middle East market by Xerjoff, and is only recently getting wider distribution.  The experience of wearing this scent begins with holding its bottle, a smooth velvet that is luxurious to the touch, but it is the scent inside that I am over the moon for. The scent opens with grapefruit and a light application of pink pepper, then gives way to a soft duet of lavendar and rose. Where the quality of this perfume comes through, though, is in the 3rd layer of fragrance, comprised of sandalwood, cashmere and a tiny bit of oud, an effect that perfume reviewers call “a woody fantasia.”

This fragrance is a definite splurge but I love to wear it for a special dinner or evening. It’s absolutely gorgeous and its depth is unsurpassed. Legend status.

 

Penhaligons:  Vaara

I also discovered this one in Dubai although Penhaligon’s is much more readily available in the US. I must have spent a full day at the Dubai Mall smelling every perfume, and came away with some definite winners. This one is also a departure for me as it is sweeter than most of my favorites, but it is so unique that I couldn’t leave it behind. Vaara is inspired by the Royal House of Marwar-Jodphur in Rajasthan, and started life as the passion of His Highness Gaj Singh II who wanted to reflect his family’s deep love and connection with Jodhpur. Later, perfumer Bertand Duchaufour’s journey to Jodhpur provided him with an abundance of inspiration for the fragrance and the end result, Vaara, was born. The perfume has head notes of quince, rosewater, carrot seed, and saffron, heart notes of moroccan rose, Bulgarian Rose, Freesia, Indian Magnolia, Peony and Iris, and base notes of honey, white musk, cedarwood, sandalwood, benzoin resin (<– note that I have no idea what this is) and tonka bean. Due to its sweetness, I think this scent is a great spring/fall choice (I generally save the heavy ouds for winter, and the crisp citruses for summer).

 

Jo Malone: Velvet Rose & Oud Cologne

This is the perfume that lurks in conference rooms and on shirt collars alike, so wield its power wisely. I bought this at the Jo Malone store on Bleecker street, near our old apartment. This is a gorgeous mix of dark damask rose, wrapped in smoky oud wood, then spiked with clove and decadent praline. Rich, textural and magnetic; and even my most masculine man friends have been known to spritz it on and comment on how incredibly it smells. On second thought, this might actually be a cologne, but I don’t subscribe to labels and nor should you.

 

Carthusia I Profumi di Capri: Mediterraneo

My mother is allergic to most perfumes and Carthusia is the only exception due to how natural it is; after she and my father returned from Capri they couldn’t stop raving about this boutique. Later, when we were in Capri on our honeymoon, we stopped by and I fell head over heels for Mediterraneo. It smelled like August in paradise, and I needed to bring back a piece of it with me so that I could always remember it. Based on an old recipe used at the Monastery of St. Giacomo, and reconfigured for Carthusia, it is bright and exuberant- an instant classic. The scent starts with tart, juicy lemons (which are in cartoonish abundance on the Amalfi coast), then journeys into crushed green tea leaves, lemon verbena, and a hint of lime peels. There are also vague hints of other fruits and florals and a distinctly, every so slightly soapy scent which is complete perfection on a summer day. Carthusia also makes intoxicating home fragrances and incense, which were placed in abundance throughout the Hotel Ceasar Augustus where we stayed. They are all divine.

 

And there you have it, a trip around the world, from Chicago to New York, Capri to Dubai, and throughout the seasons of the year and the illusions of time. Which fragrances spark your memory and moods?

xoxox

Miss Sheiky

 

 

 

i tonya I

I’m Back!

Well hello there!

I am back after an embarrassingly long “hiatus” that was really not a hiatus at all but 6+ months in the trenches of LIFE on the most intense level!  But I am so thrilled to be back at Maison Sheik with some very exciting life news and a recap on what I have been up to!

 

Studies:

Image via Ace Interior Design

When we last connected, I was just beginning my studies at Parson’s, and have since completed a number of in depth projects, including a complete redesign of the Parson’s Lobby into a restaurant and cafe space, a bedroom for a 10 year old girl with a passion for math, and my personal favorite, a Louis XV inspired pool house in Miami! I can’t wait to show you some of the work that I put together on these! I can’t tell you how much my technical expertise or vision have improved, and I am so excited to embark on this journey further this year. It has been the most rewarding and fulfilling discovery of my life so far! Speaking of decorating:

 

We Moved to Brooklyn!

After 10 years in Greenwich Village (yes, a full decade!) we made the move to Boerum Hill. It’s been incredible. We sleep with the windows open when it’s warm, and we see trees from every window of our (much more expansive) place. We have a working fireplace and 2 floors and basically, to a New Yorker, that sounds like fiction, but it’s true. We absolutely adore it here. I can’t wait to share pictures as we continue to finish decorating!

 

Work: 

After probably the most intense year of grinding it out, bending over backward like I was a gymnast in cirque du soleil, and what amounted to a full fledged political campaign (the trifecta according to tech) I earned a very hard fought for promotion at work in November. So now I can breathe again. It feels good. Especially because I worked intensely through some of the sickest and hardest months of my life when i should have probably been staying home nursing a gatorade, which leads to my next piece of news.

 

Baby!

My husband and I are expecting a baby girl in 2 weeks you guys! (Also, is there anything better than fat baby feet? I couldn’t resist the image above) Anyway, we can’t really believe it either. Going through this experience has made me realize just how miraculous the perpetuation of life is on this planet. We cannot wait to meet her and see her face. But first, a little recap of how the pregnancy has gone so far….

Memorial Day weekend, our friends Hilary and Allen invited us up to their family friend’s place, a summer camp in the Northeast Kingdom, Vermont. We decided to drive up the Thursday prior to the weekend’s kickoff so as to avoid the traffic leaving New York City. An idea which was, of course, shared by approximately 8 MM other people. Anticipating that this was the case, we picked up cold cut sandwiches at the Bedford Cheese shop on Irving place before hitting the road. I didn’t make it past Westchester before my vision turned blurry and I broke into a cold sweat. In other words, I became rapidly and deathly ill. And so we made a detour at a particularly lovely gas station in Larchmont as I proceeded to get more and more ill. Our husbands deliberated outside as to whether my husband and I should uber it back to the city and call it a day. Meanwhile, Hilary cornered me outside the bathroom.

“Dude, do you think maybe you’re pregnant?”

“Absolutely not,” I replied. After “trying” for 3 months, we had lost steam and decided to enjoy our lives instead (our resilience knows no bounds). Which amounted to us living it up, going out, sleeping little and generally having a ball for the month preceding. In other words, there was no way my body was a hospitable temple for anything other than late night falafel.

An hour later we were back on the road and I promptly fell asleep in my husband’s lap, and 5 hours after that we arrived at a freezing and rainy summer camp. The rest of the weekend brought sunshine, boat rides, feasts overlooking the lake, plenty of raw cheese and other indulgences, and an overall marvelous time. But when we returned to the city, Hilary’s words returned to me, and so I decided to take a test and just put the issue to rest.

Reader, it was positive.

From there started 18 weeks of the most brutal illness I have ever encountered. Every day was a fight to survive. But I did. And after that, I felt amazing. And inexplicably, she continued to grow.

And here we are, in the final stretch, excited, terrified, but ready to dislodge this baby from my rib cage ;-). I started my leave from work December 22nd, and after hosting my in laws for Christmas and getting a number of things in order home wise, I am rededicating myself to my loves, one of which is this beautiful blog.

So, those are the broad strokes, with A LOT to share in between.  Needless to say, I am thrilled to be back and sharing this journey with all of you! Thank you for reading!

xoxoxo

Miss Sheiky

i tonya I

Felice Varini

St. Francis of Assisi stated that the “happiness of our lives depends upon the quality of our thoughts,” implying that our perspective on the world, and our experience of it, are one in the same.  No one translates this concept more compellingly than artist Felice Varini, the master illusionist whose large-scale projections super-imposed onto architectural spaces similarly force us to question the role of perspective in how we view the world. Viewed from one specific vantage point, his installations are precise, geometric forms that seemingly hover in front of the structure that they are painted onto; viewed from others they take on the appearance of complete randomness- shattered lines or panes of glass. To view a Varini piece in person is, I imagine, to waver between confusion and complete awe.

   L to R (Arche e Corone, Grand Palais, Arche e Corone)

His technique is anamorphosis, which is defined by a distorted projection or drawing that appears normal when viewed from a particular point or lens. But finding that ideal vantage point is not in itself Varini’s objective for the viewer. Notes the artist, “The viewer can be present in the work, but as far as I am concerned he may go through it without noticing the painting at all. If he is aware of the work, he might observe it from the vantage point and see the complete shape. But he might look from other points of views where he will not be able to understand the painting because the shapes will be fragmented and the work too abstract. Whichever way, that is ok with me.”

Eglises des Jesuites

That said, viewers who are willing to work to find that lens develop a greater intimacy with the allocated space than they would have if they were just passing through. And what Varini’s work accomplishes is the feat of forcing the viewer to slow down, question their surroundings, and experience their surroundings. In a city like New York, it is these spaces that take on such a special role in the public sphere.

 

Eglises des Jesuites

This is why Varini is such a compelling artist to channel for an interior space. The duality of his work is what makes it striking: simple shapes against ornate architectural detail; primary colors projected against neutrals; crisp paint relative to crumbling infrastructure; immense scale versus the precise vantage point at which the picture comes together. All of this should be reflected in a space that truly embodies his art.

 

In this, we join the ranks of numerous cities who recognize the wonder of his approach and commission him to rejuvenate public spaces and historic monuments. With washable paint he has wrought an indelible mark on many antiquities, painting the walls of Versailles, 12th century abbeys in western France, 15th century Augustinian monasteries in Monte Carasso, and alleyways in New Haven alike.  Interpreting his references, we will create a space that forces New Yorkers to consider the world around them in a new way.

                       

(L to R: 56, Avenue du President Wilson, New Haven Alleyway, Grand Palais, Trois Triangle Orange.

In a city where old is frequently torn down to make way for new, super imposing the modern on top of the crumbling is a novel and welcome concept indeed.

 

Sept Couronnes Excentriques, Felice Varini, Le Chateua d’Olonne, France, 2006

i tonya I

Parson’s School of Design- Part I

Yesterday was my first day of class at Parson’s School of Design, and I’m kicking off my coursework with Interior Space Planning. I thought it might be fun to take you all along for the journey from concept to virtual execution, and take you into the approach of a (budding) designer!

As a first assignment, we were asked to research and review the work of a contemporary artist, and choose one to be both the inspiration for and client of our space. We were given the following list of artists to choose from. Talk about an impossible choice! See below for sampling of their work. Can you guess which one I chose before I reveal my first assignment? Which would you choose as your inspiration?

 

Maya LIn

 

Anish Kapoor

 

 

Yayoi Kusama

Jesus Soto

Ann Hamilton

Richard Serra

Michael Heizer

Ai Wei Wei

Kara Walker

Jenny Holzer

James Turrell

Felice varini

Olafur Elliason

i tonya I

Foooood

I’m fairly certain that if the average person ate what we ate any given week they would balloon outta control, but such is the benefit of walking being your only means of reliable transportation (F– uber, if you haven’t already). We walk to work in heat, rain and snow, lugging laptops and gym clothes; we walk from the grocery store laden down with meat and vegetables, we walk to the park with our papers to relax, we walk to clear our minds and breathe fresh air, we walk when there is nothing else on the agenda.

All of which is justification for the outright gluttony that we practice on a regular basis. The experience of which I have decided to share with you on an ongoing basis- because they are DELUSHUS and God wants you to know about them. Go, go immediately and let me know what you think. Or don’t, so we can keep getting tables. Either way we all win.

 

Pig Bleecker

Pig Bleecker opened earlier this year on the corner of Bleecker and Thompson (otherwise known as the very center of the universe), and it is craymazing.

(Not pictured below- the man who sits on the corner all night singing “OH NA NA” as everyone around him slowly loses their minds)

Don’t pay attention to the name (or do, if you indulge in that sort of thing- yours truly has been swine free since ’83). We’ve now been about 5 times, and each time has been glorious.

The bar, despite being small, is big on design, and the bartenders are lovely. It is the perfect place to stop in for an innocent drink and then remain, 2 hours later, having consumed upwards of 11,000 calories. That’s just the type of place this is.

The blackened market fish is delicious and perfectly seasoned. The Bleecker Burger is a heart attack on a plate and my husband dreams about it. But the real pinch hitter here, is the Smoked and Fried Whole Chicken for two, served with waffles, cheesy grits, honey, Alabama white sauce, a variety of hot sauces, and Pappy Van Winkle Maple Syrup. Y’ALLL. Can we discuss the maple syrup for a second? It is literally one of the best things I’ve ever eaten. We were licking the bowl. The chicken is tender and smoky and crispy and defies the laws of physics. The cheesy grits and the perfectly done waffles are there when you think you can’t possible have another bite but then your stomach magically grows another stomach. All of it is euphorically tasty.

Pig Bleecker gets an A+ for the food, A- for the space (beautifully designed if a little tight at times), and probably a B+ for date night because afterwards the only horizontal action available to you will be watching SVU as you revel deliriously in the joy of the memories.

Love to love you Pig Bleecks, welcome to the hood.

i tonya I

Weekend Recap

Weekends are just the absolute best, especially when you don’t have children (sorry, but also per our experience, true), and we lived it up and laid like logs in due measure.

Friday night we had a great friend and former mutual colleague over for appetizers, followed by the tasting menu at Domo Domo for dinner. Domo Domo is one of my  absolute favorites in the city for sushi, and have just expanded into a massive new space next door on Houston street as well. For the best meal, the experience at the original bar, where each pair is assigned a dedicated chef- is unbeatable. This time, we sat in the new space, which was beautifully done if not grossly understaffed. Nonetheless, the food was exceptional and the company even better. It was a perfect Friday night.

Saturday we woke up to torrential and unceasing downpours that lasted all day, leaving us with a pretty ideal situation: a brand new season of Master of None, and virtually nothing else competing for our time. We somehow managed to watch 6 episodes in a row, and each one is absolutely masterful. I already knew Aziz Ansari was a genius, but the light he sheds on the lives of women, people of color, immigrants, the children of immigrants, friendship, religion, wanderlust, career dissatisfaction, and relationships- is astounding. Needless to say, we barrelled through the remaining episodes on Sunday and don’t regret a single moment. HIGHLY recommend Master of None on Netflix for those who haven’t yet enjoyed it.

Aziz biking through Modena in Episode I – shot in black in white in an homage to old Italian cinema

Francesca (Aziz’s on-show love interest) and Dev (Aziz) in Washington Square Park

Eventually, we had to rise up for some fresh air, and attended a birthday party on the Upper East Side for a dear friend of ours who is extremely talented and all around lovely. With the intent to just pop in for a drink, we ended up staying for 4 hours. I think the running theme here is that my husband and I completely lack self control, lol.

As the Italians say, ALLORA….onto Sunday.

Minetta Tavern

Sunday morning started off as it usually does, with coffee and the paper, and we followed it up with a beautiful and sunny walk through Washington Square and deep into the east village, looping back again to meet our friend Tom for brunch at Minetta Tavern. We have a shared obsession with Minetta’s divine burgers and decided to gorge ourselves this Sunday, if for no other reason than that none of us had plans with our mothers for brunch. As always, it was decadent and amazing.

Washington Square truly showing off after the rain

 

Batman even made an appearance

There was a brief but intense rain storm that followed in the afternoon, followed by the most glorious sunshine, and we decided once again to head to the park. It was the dreamiest Sunday afternoon- the sun was so bright it created rainbows in the fountain, and the bubble man was there making these enormous bubbles that all of the children were going mad for. We sat on a bench and watched the young families with the small children who were losing their minds, the couples on romantic strolls, the beautiful dogs standing majestically in pairs, and all of the characters with boomboxes strapped to bicycles who come to the park to get attention. It was a quintessentially New York day, and the perfect end to a perfect weekend.

Finally, I’d be remiss to comment on Mother’s Day itself being yesterday. Being the excellent children we are, we sent our mother’s flowers to enjoy for the entirety of the weekend, and woke them up with calls yesterday too. We love them both so dearly, and are so lucky to have them in our lives. Mothers make the world go round (literally) and the ones in our midst are the very best, and deserve all of the love and adoration not just yesterday, but everyday. To them all, I wish a million weekends like these, or at the least, a million little kisses and hugs to make up for it.

With all my love,

Miss Sheiky xxx